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"We just put the 'gay' back into Dorian Gray."

HEART ATTACK IDLES FAITHFULL
From the NY Post's Page Six
A RECENT heart attack cost Marianne Faithfull a plum role in a new screen adaptation of Oscar Wilde's "The Picture of Dorian Gray."

Faithfull — the razor-voiced rock goddess and style icon of '60s Britain — is doing fine, her friends say.

But according to prickly Brit filmmaker Duncan Roy, Faithfull, 58 — infamous for being Mick Jagger's one-time lover-muse and writer of the Rolling Stones' classic "As Tears Go By" — was forced to decline the role of the countess in the director's just-wrapped adaptation of Wilde's story, set in New York City.

"Marianne really wanted to do it but had to pull out at the last moment," Roy tells PAGE SIX. "[Her manager and boyfriend] Francoise Ravard told me she had a slight heart attack. She's fine now." Ravard did not return e-mails. Faithfull's William Morris agent was unable to reach her at press time.

The news comes on the heels of Faithfull's well-received album "After the Poison," [sic] a collaboration with performers like P.J. Harvey and Nick Cave. Faithfull, whose cigarette-charred pipes would give Harvey Fierstein pause, recently quit smoking.

The working-class-born Roy, famed for his experimental 2002 film "AKA" — based on his experiences infiltrating London's upper crust by posing as a young British lord — recast Nastassia Kinski in Faithfull's role.

David Gallagher, the 18-year-old star of TV's "7th Heaven," portrays bisexual Dorian Gray in the art-house flick, which earlier this year looked to be going head to head against another adaptation that pretty-boy actor Ryan Phillippe planned to produce, direct and play the lead in.

Roy, who publicly fought with Elizabeth Hurley on the set of his film "Method" — he now calls her "a [bleeping] bitch" — has equally unflattering words for Phillippe: "Who was going to believe that he's 18 years old?" (Phillippe is 31.)

Roy, who turned 40 on Friday, can rest easy. Asked about Phillippe's purported Wilde project, the actor's flack says, simply, "It went away." Enthuses Roy: "I've won the battle of the Dorian Grays!"

The cautionary tale of a hedonistic young man who never ages while a portrait of him grows older by the day was made into movies in 1945 and 1970.

"The film is sexually graphic. It's not rampant . . . but there is one very hot same-sex scene," says openly gay Roy. "We just put the 'gay' back into Dorian Gray."

2nd Degree:
Nastassia Kinski
http://www.matherart.com/fineart/portraits/n.kinski.jpg
http://www.twinkle.com.hk/photo/photoh/phonk001.jpg


3rd Degree:
Isn't this guy Bill Mather great?
http://www.matherart.com/fineart/studies/beach_gisele.jpg

4th Degree:
Same Guy? A digital matte artist and VFX supervisor
http://imdb.com/name/nm0558436/
http://www.resourcesfx.com/portfolio/mather/media/london.jpg

5th Degree:
Guess he like so many others and myself donated to the cause
http://www.maverixstudios-llc.com/TSUNAMI_IMAGES/TSUNAMI_artwork/b_mather.jpg

Interesting, very interesting!

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