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Frakking Danes: Islamic Cartoon Scuffle Timeline

How did it start? Why is it so big? Well, people are pissed...personally I wouldn't want images of my prophet depicted if that was considered sacriligie. But on the other hand, would any of the cartoonists/writers/editors have published a page knowing people would die.

Maybe they would've, freedom of the press right? When interesected with the freedom of the people, people die. I'm still not totally convinced this isn't part of a US psyops operation...but this newspaper is the biggest in Denmark.

  • November-December 2005:
    Danish Muslims travel throughout the Middle East to tell people about the cartoons and call for protest. They carry with them not only the published cartoons, but also a few others – even more offensive – that were sent to them by private Danish citizens.

    Oct. 14, 2005:
    Members of 16 Danish Muslim organizations condemn Jyllands-Posten, claiming the newspaper acted provocatively and insulted Muslim sensibilities.
  • CBC STORY: Muslims condemn 'insulting' pictures of prophet

    Oct. 12, 2005:
    The Palestinian representative in Denmark and ambassadors from 10 countries with Muslin populations send a letter to Fogh Rasmussen demanding a meeting with him and urging action against Jyllands-Posten. Fogh Rasmussen would later decline to meet with them.

    Sept. 30, 2005:
    Jyllands-Posten publishes 12 drawings of Muhammad, after asking cartoonists to send in satirical drawings of the prophet. One of the drawings depicts a Danish boy, named "Muhammad," writing in Arabic on a chalkboard: "Jyllands-Posten's journalists are a bunch of reactionary provocateurs." Flemming Rose, the paper's cultural editor, said the call for pictures was a reaction to the rising number of situations in which artists and writers censure themselves out of fear of radical Islamists.
  • READ THE REST @ CBC
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