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'Entourage' Gang Dishes on Fame and Family

The team behind the Hollywood hit reflects on the HBO comedy's true message at the Paley Festival

By Daniel Fienberg

March 2 2006

Jeremy Piven, 'Entourage'
Jeremy Piven of 'Entourage'
LOS ANGELES --
"Entourage," the HBO comedy about a group of friends flying by the seat of their pants in the face of Hollywood fame, is, apparently, flying by the seat of its pants creatively as well.

Facing questions about the show's upcoming 20-episode third season, "Entourage" creator Doug Ellin repeatedly told the crowd at the Museum of Television and Radio's annual Paley Festival that he's usually too busy trying to get each individual episode right to know where the series is going long-term. Even when the crowd at the Wednesday (March 1) event tried to compliment Ellin on the show's richer second season, he would barely take credit.

"There was definitely no design to make it more full in the second season, but the first season I had really no idea what I was doing," Ellin says.

Among the things that Ellin admitted happened by chance include last season's extended "Aquaman" arc, in which rising star Vinnie Chase (Adrian Grenier) scored the lead in James Cameron's film version of the comic franchise. What could have been a toss-off joke, took up a season's worth of negotiations, training and screen tests, a plausible production instead of a joke.

"When you think of the movie 'Aquaman,' it sounds kind of bad," Ellin notes, "But when you go 'James Cameron's Aquaman' ..."

READ IT ALL AT ZAP2IT

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