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R. Kelly's Not So Brotherly Love

By Sarah Hall1 hour, 38 minutes ago

R. Kelly's brother, Carey, believes he can't lie.

The "Trapped in the Closet" singer's younger sibling has released a low-budget DVD on which he accuses his brother of trying to get him to commit perjury, according to MTV News.

According to Carey Kelly, his brother wanted him to take the fall by claiming that he was actually the star of the infamous sex tape that prompted child-pornography charges against R. Kelly.

On the DVD, released Tuesday, Carey Kelly alleges that his more famous brother offered him $50,000, a house and a record contract if he would agree to testify that he appeared on the tape, but that he turned the offer down because he did not want to lie.

"I got a call about a year and a half ago," Carey claims on the DVD, produced by Drahma Magazine. "My brother wanted me to do some s--t pertaining to this case that would leave me behind bars with a record deal. It doesn't make sense, so I turned it down.

"Since I couldn't lie for him in a court of law, we're back to beefing again, and we ain't brothers no more."

The rumor that R. Kelly planned to finger his look-alike brother as the star of the sex tape first circulated several years back, but the R&B star's lawyers denied that the ploy was part of their defense strategy.

Carey Kelly also claims that his brother beats his wife, Andrea; tried to molest their other brother's daughter; molested their 12-year-old second cousin; and--oh yeah--that he's bisexual.

"He trapped in the closet for real," Carey Kelly said in a radio interview with New York's Hot 97.

Read the rest...


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