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Recent Katrina News

“Yet, 19 months after the levees broke and destroyed parts of the city, people are still struggling to get back to a ‘normal' life.”

Most restaurants close at 10 p.m., she wrote. Nonfunctioning traffic lights sit curled up on street corners, twisted and uprooted from their cement bases. Many streets lack street signs. Schools, health care providers, restaurants and groceries are absent in many parts of the city.

“I found myself wondering,” Sadasivam wrote, “ ‘How can this be?' and ‘How can this be happening in America?' ” - The storm has not ended: UCD law students spend spring break helping victims of Hurricane Katrina


Many of his clients, said Mr. Bricker, were residents of New Orleans' public housing projects, evacuated from low-rise brick apartment buildings now shut down by the Department of Housing and Urban Development, which plans to raze the units and replace them with mixed-income homes.

"With minor repairs," said Mr. Bricker of the barricaded projects, "poor people could move back in there tomorrow."

During a luncheon prior to the panel discussion, Kenneth Feinberg, the Washington, D.C., attorney appointed special master of the federal September 11th Victim Compensation Fund, asked a simple question: Why has such a fund not been established by the federal government in the wake of Hurricane Katrina? - Columbia Law Panel Probes Slow Response to Katrina
More News, Good and Bad
U2's instruments auctioned off to help Katrina victims
FEMA wants Katrina aid back
Google updates Katrina imagery, denies it’s evil

CARTOON SURFING KATRINA

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