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Taking Sides, Black or Gay

Jasmyne Cannick, who worked with Washington on the Pan African Arts Festival, said she's infuriated ABC booted Washington from the show's upcoming fourth season for calling Knight a "faggot" during a scuffle on the set and believes it smacks of racism. So she's launched a petition - which had 1,233 signatures as of last night - to get the actor his job back.

The petition says Washington's firing "further adds to a disturbing new trend at ABC wherein minority actors have been dismissed at an alarming rate over the past two years. Blacks, including . . . Star Jones ('The View'), Harold Perrineau ('Lost'), Alfre Woodard, Mehcad Brooks and Page Kennedy ('Desperate Housewives') have been let go . . . One must ask themselves, what is going on? . . . While we don't approve of [Washington's] use of the F-word at the Golden Globes, Washington has since apologized and gone on to perform community service by way of a public service announcement for the very organizations that have been orchestrating his dismissal. But it seems it wasn't enough."


I know and have known Jasmyne for years, she's one of the strongest leaders the BlaQue community has. Still I don't agree, I think it odd to separate my identity. I am black and queer, you say faggot we fight. You say nigger we fight.

After years of rumor of I.W's tirades on set, including his altercations with women actors...I wish she'd chosen a better example than him. I stopped listening to Em when he was full of fag words, but because I'm black I'm supposed to take the angry black man's side no matter what? Say it ain't so, say it ain't so!

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