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The Bi Is Back!

I asked a question, in desperation. Like sand skipping unnaturally back into the sea, bisexuality is disappearing. A famous celeb declares love for a woman, as she has for men before and a biological reality isn't even broached. Tila Tequila cements bisexuality as a culture, as a way of living and not a life. Words Matter and I'm screaming them from the proverbial rooftops.

I'm really thankful Ted C. of E! Online posted my question in the first place and sparked up a conversation, kicking some folks into gear within our own bisexual community. To me that is the work of an ally. An ally is not necessarily me, they don't always say it the way I would want but they help get us closer. Use the chance to educate and invigorate! Sure, we attack ourselves and allies before rushing out the door in the right way, but eventually righteous fire finds it's true mark. Perhaps some saw the poll as a last straw, but I think that's an unconscious way to look at it. The poll represents reality, what are you doing to change someone's mind about that if you disagree? Folks, including Ted C. I might add, worked years to help change opinion on same sex marriage and the need for visibility (have you forgotten Toothy Tile?)

Bisexuals have to and are doing the same, and we must keep trying.

In response to the poll, and with great love I sent this to Ted:

Sorry that my half hearted attempt to question the lack of "bisexual option" for La Lohan turned some bisexuals on the wrong way.
"
or as "out & proud" Sheela Lambert notes ". . . there is one for haters and two for heteroflexible girls. I dont want to sign up as either an experimenter or dating a girl until I meet the right guy. I have been out as bi for over 30 years and have dated both guys, women and transgender people" - Bialogue

So how about it Ted, feel like adding a button? There's No and Maybe, but no definitive Yes is there? Remember we're not exactly a highway from one orientation to the next, but more of a welcome mat of goodness. Step gently?
He replied in the affirmative, respectfully and warmly so. Folks out there may not know E!, may not have spent the years chilling with Talk Soup, adoring Anna Nicole, or incorporating a good amount of TEDSPEAK into their vocabulary. Personally, I'm proud that Ted is one of my biggest influences as a writer, all that casual wit and sarcastic sweetness in a shiny hunk of a package to boot. He's like the Douglas Adams of Gossip and lucky for US, he came out years and years ago. He got married and has held the queer flag in high profile for plenty a day. I think that should count for a damn lot.

Me, myself, I consider myself a bisexual activist -- I reclaim the word, and see myself as two and whole at the same time. STILL I'VE NEVER BEEN ARRESTED FOR TRYING TO ENTER A CHURCH THAT DON'T LIKE QUEERS, HAVE YOU?


This is some horrid stuff, cants believe it would happen in October of 2008. Wait, I can.

From Lauren Parke*,
The Director of Safety from Palm Beach Atlantic University read a statement as we gathered outside the school's chapel on Monday, October 13, 2008. "You are unwanted guests." Fully aware that handcuffs were waiting, six of us then stepped forward, persisting in our intention to attend the morning service there. Arris and Lindsay, two students whom we'd spoken with extensively the day before, had been so certain we would be allowed in that they even promised to sit with us. Tears streamed down their faces as the police slipped zip-ties around our wrists and loaded us into their van. Our fellow Riders held hands and tried to hold back their own tears as they sung, "Just As I Am."
What are you doing today? When's the last time you made a stand? Sent an email, took action, let someone know how you feel and/or made a ruckus?

Do Something. Today. Stand for bisexuality, for same sex marriage, for Obama, and healing the world as we recognize all of the diversity still striving within.

*(disclosure:Best almost-a-date I ever had)

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