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Repeal The Marriage Ban: Fight Continues

Been a long ass week, full of protests. Last night I was driving over to C&B's for "Heroes" when I passed by a No on H8 rally in my Inglewood, CA neighborhood. The rainbow flag and rally sign were still in my backseat so I stopped and rallied for a few hours. Twas awesome to be out there with people of color, chanting, singing and demanding our rights.

On Saturday, the Silverlake protest went well, peaceful and tons of folks. Lots of chances to dispel the myth of black lgbt folks being forever invisible. I was so proud of the many POC queers out in full force, and uber proud of the mainstream lgbt love for us. Sure, there was a sign or two, "Gay is the new Black" being one of them, but the Black Revolutionary Committee made their own signs too: "Gay is not the new Black, Black Gay is!" UCLA's Queer Alliance, La Familia and BlaQue joined us and we're able to do a couple chants of our own, "Colored, Queer!" and "Si, Se Pueda"(Yes, We Can) which was cool. It's hard as hell to be out there sometimes, but we gotta do it. Most of the time when I'm marching in these things my signs are pointed in as well as out, because racism and ignorance within the mainstream LGBT community absolutely exists.

It's been an amazing wake up call for the larger LGBT movement when it comes to the Black community. I've been telling my non Black LGBT friends for years, don't get it twisted, just because someone likes you as their hair dresser or finger snaps along with you don't mean shit. After years of delivering homophobia workshops to the black community, protesting injustice from within and getting royally screwed by mainstream LGBT groups -- I kinda hung up my spurs and focused more efforts on my other margin, bisexuality. But hearing the words of that young woman in West Hollywood, "Is this a Latino or Gay Rights Rally?", boy it spurned me back into BlaQue action. I'm so sick and tired of being sick and tired though, aren't you?

silverlake march
People like Wilson Cruz keep me going. Actor extraordinare, you may remember him best from "My So Called Life", he's out in the streets at every protest flyering!

I've read Jasmyne Cannick's piece for the LA Times, and I had the opportunity to speak with her re: a bit of it and general protests. She feels like so many BlaQue folk, we need to focus on our own community issues. I can respect that, and lord knows Black folks are in need of activists who are dedicated to the issues that disproportionally affect us due to color. HOWEVER, I STRONGLY FEEL THERE NEEDS TO BE A BLACK LGBT VOICE WITHIN THE LARGER SAME SEX MARRIAGE BATTLE. And so I plan on continuing to speak. I will continue to form coalitions and take names, cells and emails from LGBT Black folks who are ready and willing to be out and proud for this 'cause. We must continue to get our faces in front of the leadership and the press, so we can show the world what the rainbow really looks like.

I got to talk a little bit about that on KPCC's Talk Radio, download the program here. If you're a member of the press looking to speak with LGBT African Americans who are actively part of the movement, contact thefayth@gmail.com! I've got several folks who're ready and willing to be heard, and who want to know more folks of the same ilk. We plan on having a kickback BBQ in the next month or two, hang out and organize and just be. Black, Queer, and still here.

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