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Comments on “the block” from bisexual people

This is stunning and sad.  I don't see how a company can say that they are a strong supporter of the LGBT community and then marginalize a large part of that community.  As a category of porn, I can't imagine that bisexual is any more prevalent than "gay", if for no other reason, there isn't any where near as much of it.  One of the biggest issues facing bisexuals is isolation and lack of community.  When the #1 search engine in the world, makes it harder to find information and a community, it is terribly unfortunate. - Jim Larsen, Secretary/Treasurer of the Bisexual Organizing Project / BECAUSE Conference Chair 2012

"Google's block on the word "bisexual" is extremely frustrating! As a bisexual activist, I am often stymied in my efforts to find and reach bi organisations that I know are there! How much more disheartening must it be for those people who don't know what resources are there, and because of the block, can't find them?" - Lou Hoffman, Minneapolis MN

As an activist and educator I work daily to combat the negative
attitudes and myths that surround all of us about bisexuality and
fluid identities in general. It saddens me to learn about the google
block on the word bisexual on instant search and I would expect more
from the company - especially considering the purported  "LGBT
support." This requires a simple fix (unblock the word!), and I look
forward to seeing google take action to demonstrate its firm support
for the bisexual community. Combatting negative attitudes, and basic
invisibility, is my daily reality as a person attracted to people of
many genders. It saddens me to see such an important resource (google)
contribute to my invisibility. - Christina Chala, New York, NY

One of the most important things that organized bisexual groups do is create resources and connection for individuals trying to find community, primarily on the Internet. With Google's blocking of the word "bisexual," it makes it that much more difficult for those in need of support to find us. - Ellen Ruthstrom, President Bisexual Resource Center – Boston, MA

It is unfortunate that our community's name itself is so entrenched in the public's vernacular as taboo. I'm glad Google, an ally to our community, gave Ms. Cheltenham such a dignified response that acknowledged both the technological situation and a commitment to do their best to remedy the situation.  - Halina Reed, Facebook

I look forward to them fixing this in the next month then - and will test again then. It is intolerable that a minority group of people with very real need for sensible information and community are having barriers put in their way by a search engine. If in one month's time this is still the case I will be advising all my contacts to use a different search engine. - Nickie Roome, Facebook

I bet the exact same correlation happens with the terms gay and lesbian, too. As a researcher on LGBTQ health I have often had to sift through porn returns on searches to find community reports and other items. - Margaret Robinson, Facebook

gay porn - 133,000,000 results
lesbian porn - 59,100,000 results
bisexual porn - 34,900,000 results
transsexual porn - 7,960,000 results
transgender porn - 5,050,000 results
- Jasmin Cornelia Dovjak, Facebook

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