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BiNet USA President Faith Cheltenham Is Bruin Pride

Had some fun recently at UCLA's LGBT Resource Center, shooting a segment for "I am Bruin Pride", a documentary and archival project honoring the words, stories, and contributions of LGBT students, faculty, staff and alumni of UCLA.





  

 Image Copyright Jack Kaden, I Am Bruin Pride Project 2015


About The "I Am Bruin Pride" project:
UCLA's LGBT Campus Resource Center proudly presents the I Am Bruin Pride Project, a documentary and archival project honoring the words, stories, and contributions of LGBT students, faculty, staff and alumni of UCLA.

“I Am Bruin Pride” presents the stories, experiences, and contributions of LGBT students, staff, faculty, and alumni of UCLA in an inclusive and diverse manner. Each interviewee has been picked based on a variety of factors contributing towards a diversity in race, experience, orientation, and identity. Featuring a poster series and an interview, “I Am Bruin Pride” documents the important histories of those within the UCLA LGBT community.

Here's the link to the "I Am Bruin pride" nomination form. Anyone is welcome to nominate themselves or someone else.


In prep for my interview I put together some bullet points of what I got up to while at UCLA...and what I've been up to recently!

UCLA Accomplishments

1998
Sexual Violence Prevention Program Director, Student Welfare Commission

1999
HRC Campaign College Internship on Gore 2000 campaign
(My reference letter was provided by UCLA LGBT Center Director Ronni Sanlo)

2000
Board member, La Familia

2001-2004
  • Co-chair/Co-Founder, UCLA’s BlaQue
  • Co-chair/Co-Founder, UCLA’s Fluid
  • Co-Founder, UCLA’s Queer x Girl
  • Co-chair/Co-Founder of UCLA’s Queer Alliance 
  • Managed organization’s budgets (over $67,000) 
  • Created annual Queer Student Leadership Retreat in Lake Arrowhead
  • Co-created “The Other Side of The Rainbow (TOSTR)” to celebrate LGBT POC
  • Established computer lab for Queer Student Center
  • Presented at UC-LGBTIA conference, Feb.  2004.  UC San Diego.
    2005
    Chair – UCLA’s EnigmaCon 2005: A Tsunami Relief Benefit

    UCLA AWARDS 
    UCLA Women for Change Student Leader Award, 2003 
    “Zeke” Weber Award for Excellence in Activism and Education, 2005

    Accomplishments at large

    • Appearances on 2006 Emmy award-winning FX Networks docu-series show on race in America, “Black. White”.
    • Successful corporate launches of web/digital projects for clients like Macmillan’s tor.com, Oprah Winfrey Network’s “Finding Sarah” show, and Warner Bros.’ “Harry Potter Book 7 Part 2” film.
    • Writing for Huffington Post, Advocate, South Florida Gay News, and the BiNet USA blog or my personal testimonies on Truth Wins Out, #StillBisexual, I’m From Driftwood and the Center for American Progress.
    • Speaking engagements at locations as varied as the California Democrats State Convention, The GLBT History Museum, The United States Senate Hart Building, San Diego Comic Con, UCLA, The White House, HRC’s Time to THRIVE Conference and Yale University.  
    • Appointee, University of California LGBT Task Force (2012-2014)
    • Co-organizer, 2013 Bisexual Community Issues Roundtable at the White House
    • 2014 invitee and stage participant, White House Executive Order signing 
    • First president of a bisexual non-profit to meet with a sitting U.S. President alongside other LGBT leaders.
    • Parent to a child, “Storm”

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