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What A Bisexual Letter Of Recommendation Can Look Like: Lynnette McFadzen for Equality March for Unity & Pride

Somewhere out there, bisexual organizers are still hoping against hope to be included in the organizing for the new National LGBT Pride March. May the Lord Goddess bless and keep them!

One of my favs, Lynnette McFadzen, both a friend and colleague, asked for a letter of recommendation and this is what I came up with and just sent along.

Here's hoping that bi+ organizers organizing for bi+ communities also get tapped to be part of the organizing team! Feel free to use a template like this below for your own bisexual letters of recommendation! I honestly just copied Lynnette's approach when she submitted her own letter of recommendation for longtime bi advocate and new BiNet USA board member Ron Suresha.
What can I say? Bisexuals love to share!

XOXO,
Faith


Dear David Bruinooge and Members of Equality March Leadership,

I would like to strongly recommend Lynnette McFadzen, new President of BiNet USA and creator/producer of The BiCast as a National Co-Chair of The Equality March for Unity & Pride.  One of the strongest and openly active bi advocates in the country today, Lynnette first came to prominence in the bisexual, pansexual, fluid, queer (bi+) community when she began The BiCast, the first podcast for the bi+ community.  Visit the archives here. https://archive.org/details/@the_bicast

In the last 4 years, Lynnette McFadzen, has put nearly 200 interviews onto iTunes covering topics from A-Z of the bisexual community inluding critically important interviews with bi thought leaders and celebrities like gender/sexuality expert Robyn Ochs, Korean-American comic and advocate Margaret Cho, bi trans icon Julia Serano, BiNet USA co-founders Lani Ka’ahumanu and Loraine Hutchins and me!

In the last 3 years, Lynnette helped me organize 3 different conferences and meetings at President Barak Obama’s White House including the 2016 Rural LGBT America Summit at the White House, the 2016 Bisexual Community Briefing at the White House, and the 2015 Bisexual Community Briefing at the White House.

In the last 2 years, Lynnette has also co-organized several high profile events for bi and LGBT communities including day long institutes for the Task Force’s Creating Change conference and BiNet USA’s panel at the 2016 Comic Con in San Diego, CA which was called one of the most affirming moments of Comic Con by BleedingCool.com, one of the comic industries biggest blogs. Last year, Lynnette was also instrumental in generating over 200 million impressions for #biweek and bisexuality related social media content working alongside GLAAD and other LGBT organizations on Bisexual Awareness Week, a social media event I co-created that’s led to an inspiring amount of new bisexual activists just like Lynnette.

In any portion of the LGBTQIA community, I have found our newest members to be the most active, but what truly makes Lynnette a legend in the making, is how much she’s gotten done while also being a disabled bisexual demisexual asexual elder who lives below the poverty line. BiNet USA has proposed 2 different co-chairs to you from our organization and I urge you to consider all applications from bi+ organizers working for bi+ communities with the care and respect they have long deserved, and have yet to find, from national LGBT Pride Marches. Change must start with someone, so let it be you David!

Best,Faith Cheltenham

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